In Memory of my Dear Mother

It looks like 2016 came in with a roar. My son survived the fiery racing accident in February and still has 4-6 months of rehab, but my mother went to be with the Lord March 24. She was almost 98 years old, so I’m thankful I had her that long, but that doesn’t make the parting any easier.

In a few more days, I’ll get back to the business of writing and blogging, but for now I’d like to post these poems to honor Mom. I wrote them years ago but never showed them to her.

Quiet Gray by Deborah Owen

She got her way with temper fits

And maybe stretched the truth a bit

Made Dad so mad he could have spit

But made me laugh… she had such grit

– My Mom

 

Born without grace and no fanfare

She’d quiet us with just one stare

To say a word, we would not dare

Tender Paradox led in prayer

– My Mom

 

She’s older now, a quiet gray

We’ll have a docile Mother’s Day

Seems strange to have her now this way

To keep her long, that’s what I pray

– My Mom

——————————–

 

 Hour Glass by Deborah Owen

She walks with halt and shuffling feet

Her high-step days are gone

A face of roadmap lines runs deep

Unpainted lips are drawn

 

But on each Mother’s Day I see

the mom who played with me

We baked mud pies and choc’late cakes

and topped them off with tea

 

Of childhood days I often think

to fill my heart with cheer

Of all the moms I could have had

She’s mine! My mother, dear.

Dorothy 97th B-day 6

 

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A Simple Way to Tell Your Valentine, “I Love You”

by Mr. E. Lynn Carroll, Creative Writing Institute Tutor

My assignment was to write about unique ways to say “I Love You” on Valentine’s Day. I looked, I Googled, I read, and I researched and what I found sounded so off the wall that I decided to just tell you what I do. If your beloved isn’t satisfied with the traditional gifting, try my simple solution.

I used to give my wife flowers on her birthday and being the practical, sensible Asian she is, she said, “Why you spend money on something I cannot eat, spend, or wear? These will die in a few days. You have foolishly wasted your money.”

Devastated, I determined to do better for Christmas, so I spent a lot of money on a nice winter coat. When she opened the present, she seemed happy. She never wore the coat. When I asked her why, being the practical, sensible Asian she is, she said, “It’s nice, but not something I would have bought.”

Doubly devastated, I gave up buying her anything for holidays, and being a stoic Asian, she never mentioned it. Nevertheless, I love her and for years, instead of buying presents, I gave her money. Still, I was unhappy. How could I solve this problem?

Now, my mother, being the acquisitive, materialistic, loving Western woman she was, brought me up to put all women on a pedestal, which is why I ended up snagged on these horns of hell. I wanted to please my wife, but material things didn’t do the job.

One Valentine’s Day, years ago, I thought about a Valentine’s card and a heart-shaped box of chocolates, but I knew it wouldn’t do. Tormenting my brain, the only thing I could come up with harkened back to grade school where we passed little notes to the girls we had a crush on. Thus, a new idea.

I decided to leave little personal love notes all over the house. Simple stuff like, “I love you. How much? The whole wide world.” I posted notes inside the refrigerator, on the bathroom mirror, under her windshield wiper… everywhere I knew she would look.

She went to work before I did, but I knew she had seen them because they were gone. When I got home that night, she had my favorite dinner, candles lit, soft music, and the whole Shtick. Bingo!

Over the years, I’ve fancied the cards up a bit. I print and cut out pictures of cute animals, beautiful scenes gleaned from online pictures, pictures of ourselves in happy poses, and then glued them to green Christmas tree shapes or red Valentine’s hearts cut out from colored construction paper, accompanied by little messages from my heart. It seems like the cornier the better.  🙂

You’re a writer! Try adding a little old-fashioned ingenuity this Valentine’s Day. It doesn’t cost a lot, it’s fun, and the rewards are amazing!

*Check out http://www.CreativeWritingInstitute.com for all your writing needs. The school where every student receives a private tutor! We give free writing evaluations, too!

 

Edgar Allan Poe, the Man

A Short Biography

by Sodiq Yusuf

You probably know Edgar Allan Poe was a renowned American author, poet, short story writer and literary critic, but what else do you know about him?

Born the second of three children on January 19, 1809, to Elizabeth and David Poe, Jr., Poe was orphaned at the age of three, and adopted by John and Frances Allan of Richmond, Virginia.

Edgar showed interest in writing at an early age. When he attended the University of Virginia, John Allan refused to pay his fees because of Poe’s gambling habit. Edgar left the school, angry, and found his first love, Elmira Royster, in Richmond.

He enlisted in the Army in 1827 under the name of Edgar A. Perry. John Allan later helped him enroll in the U.S. Military Academy. There he published Tamerlane and Other Poems. Shuffling between Baltimore, New York and Philadelphia, he continued to write, winning literary prizes and becoming the editor of the Southern Literary Messenger. As the editor, Poe brought fame to the magazine and became a fearless critic of popular writers, including Rufus Griswold.

Although Poe was already famous after publishing The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1838), The Fall of the House of Usher (1839), and “Raven” (1845), he was poor. After the death of his wife, Virginia Clemm, Poe returned to Richmond, devastated. He and his first love, Elmira Royster, (then widowed) were reunited.

At a later date, Poe disappeared for a few days, only to be found inside a bar house. At the end of a derelict life, he died in a Baltimore hospital on October 7, 1849. The cause of his death remains a mystery, but he was remembered as a gentle man with a great sense of humor.

After Poe’s death, his literary opponent, Rufus Griswold, wrote a libelous obituary and memoir, describing Poe as a lunatic, womanizer and lonely drunkard. Ironically, that writing would later be regarded as one of the best biographies ever written about Poe.

If there is a moral to be had, let it be this: one of the greatest gifted men of all time wasted his time, his talent, and his life. Don’t let the same be said of you.

Don’t forget to ‘like’ us before you leave. For more great writing tips, sign up for The Writer’s Choice Newsletter at http://cwinst.com/newslettersignup.php. Happy day!

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Writing Duo – Father and Son

by Karen Johnson-Waugh

Father’s Day is a good time to reflect on the life of C.S. Lewis, one of the greatest writers in the past 50 years. More than two decades after his death, his writing continues to inspire millions with science fiction, allegorical children’s books, and philosophical books about the Christian faith.

Clive Staples Lewis was born in Ireland in 1898 to parents Albert J. Lewis and Florence “Flora” Augusta. When C.S. was four years old, his dog, Jackie, died in an accident. From that day forth, little C.S. demanded to be called Jack.

Lewis knew Latin and Greek by the age of ten. When his father wrote poems and read them to his sons, “Jack’s” hazel eyes lit up. The family moved to the outskirts of Belfast in 1905 and he was fascinated with the town. He and his brother David created a fantasy world they named Boxen. Fictional animals ruled their land, which helped them cope with their mother’s death in 1908.

C.S. attended boarding schools and colleges, studied mythology, and became a professor at Oxford University from 1925-1954 where he became lifelong friends with a fellow professor, the famous J.R.R. Tolkien.

In 1949, the New York Times published an article by Chad Walsh called C.S. Lewis: Apostle to the Skeptics. Mr. Walsh encouraged his poet friend, Helen Gresham, to become better acquainted with Lewis. They wrote to one another until Helen eventually divorced her husband, took her two sons to England, and married C. S. in 1956. Four years later, she died of cancer.

Lewis’ work was rejected over 800 times before he sold more than 100 million copies of The Screwtape Letters (1942), The Chronicles of Narnia (1956), and The Space Trilogy (1938-1945). Lewis died of a heart attack a week before his 66th birthday on November 23, 1963.

His stepson, Douglas Gresham, wrote an autobiography entitled Lenten Lands. Douglas and his wife, Merri, adopted five Korean children. They live in Ireland where Douglas handles the C.S. Lewis literacy estate. His brother, David, lives in India with his son.

Do you want to pass writing skills down to your heirs? Today is the day to begin. Believe in yourself. Invest in yourself. Take a writing course at Creative Writing Institute. Sign up today and start tonight with your own personal tutor.

Don’t forget to ‘like’ us before you leave. For more great tips, sign up for The Writer’s Choice Newsletter (for free) at http://cwinst.com/newslettersignup.php.

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Saving a Language, One Play at a Time: Shakespeare’s Influence on English

by Tori Pakizer

William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon in England and lived from 1564 – 1616. The English language started as a mixture of Anglo-Saxon, Germanic, and Norse, but is now one of the most widely spoken and written languages in the world. Like all languages, it progressed over time.

Shakespeare’s plays and poems helped standardize English as he created as many as 2000 words and phrases we utter today. Before dictionaries, the English language held no firm spelling or grammar rules. Thanks to William Shakespeare and his influence, alumni and professors of Oxford and Cambridge Universities created the OxBridge System, using his syntax, syntax, grammar, spelling, and vocabulary.

Don’t forget to ‘like’ us before you leave. For more great tips, sign up for The Writer’s Choice Newsletter (for free) at http://cwinst.com/newslettersignup.php.

Creative Writing Institute Launches First Annual Poetry Contest

It’s FREE! It’s International! Ages 13 and up!

Read ALL the rules!

· Any form of poetry, rhyming or non-rhyming

· Must be about love, nature, or a pet

· Maximum of 15 lines

· Entry must be G-rated according to American standards

First prize: $20 Amazon Gift Card and publication on CWI’s website and blog.

Second prize: $15 Amazon Gift Card and publication as mentioned above.

Third prize: $10 and publication as mentioned above.

Joe Massingham, tutor of Fundamentals of Poetry, will judge the contest, which runs from March 1 – March 31, 2014, midnight EST.

Submit to CWIpoetry@yahoo.com. Questions? Direct queries to the same address.

By entering this contest, you are saying your entry is your original work and it has not been previously published. Winners must agree to minor editing rights for publication and grant first non-exclusive electronic rights to Creative Writing Institute.