Creative Writing Institute Launches First Annual Poetry Contest

It’s FREE! It’s International! Ages 13 and up!

Read ALL the rules!

· Any form of poetry, rhyming or non-rhyming

· Must be about love, nature, or a pet

· Maximum of 15 lines

· Entry must be G-rated according to American standards

First prize: $20 Amazon Gift Card and publication on CWI’s website and blog.

Second prize: $15 Amazon Gift Card and publication as mentioned above.

Third prize: $10 and publication as mentioned above.

Joe Massingham, tutor of Fundamentals of Poetry, will judge the contest, which runs from March 1 – March 31, 2014, midnight EST.

Submit to CWIpoetry@yahoo.com. Questions? Direct queries to the same address.

By entering this contest, you are saying your entry is your original work and it has not been previously published. Winners must agree to minor editing rights for publication and grant first non-exclusive electronic rights to Creative Writing Institute.

Anthology Contest Feb. 1-28, 2013

Creative Writing Institute’s Spring Fling Anthology Contest – No Entry Fee!

This is a themed contest.  Stories must be between 1000 and 1750 words and may be any genre, but the following sentence must appear in the story:Tonight we re-write the rules… ”

 

CASH PRIZES!  Three cash winners and seven additional Judge’s Choice stories will receive publication in our first anthology and Ebook, entitledOVERRULED!We will endeavor to sell the anthology for ninety-nine cents. Proceeds will benefit Creative Writing Institute, Inc., a 501(c)3 nonprofit charity that sponsors cancer patients in writing courses.


Accepting submissions from February 1, 2013 through February 28, 2013.
Entries must be received by midnight, February 28, 2013, USA Eastern Standard Time.

         

Learn more at https://CreativeWritingInstitute.submittable.com/submit. Hurry! CASH prizes. No entry fee. See your story in an anthology! Ends Feb. 28, 2013.

 

How to Format a Short Story

Formatting Tips

by Pat Decker Nipper

Formatting a story is designing how it looks in print. Determine the layout of your manuscript by setting parameters. Look at examples of written material. Are the letters large enough to read comfortably? Are the lines far enough apart? How are the new paragraphs formatted?

Professional formatting will make your work shine. If you follow these standards, your manuscript will be ready to submit, whether in hard copy (paper) or online. Although the following is a commonly accepted standard for formatting, individual publications occasionally vary, so be sure to check before you submit.

The 2010 Writer’s Market has illustrations of formatting and includes good advice. They say to use white 8-1/2 x 11 paper, and “ …no artsy fonts.” They also suggest you use a laser or an ink-jet printer.

Below are the common formatting standards, as developed over years of creating documents.

1. Leave one inch of space on all four margins of the paper—top, bottom, and both sides. 

2. Left justify your pages. That means every line should align on the left. The right margin is not justified, or in other words, it remains “ragged.”

3. Indent five spaces at the beginning of a new paragraph.

4. Choose an easy-to-read font. For PC users, try Times New Roman or Verdana. Macintosh users might like Palatino.

5. Set the font size at 12 point for easy readability.

6. Stay away from italics, except where needed to be grammatically correct.

7. Avoid bold, except in headings and areas where you want to emphasize text.

8. Double-space if you’re printing on paper. Single space if you’re submitting electronically, and in such case, double space between paragraphs.

9. In dialogue, each new speaker starts a new line.

10. Add your personal information in the upper left corner of the page. The title can carry over to the additional pages, along with a page number.

11. Center the title of the story and your name under it on the first page. Some publications want you to start the first page about one-third of the way down. Check their style and follow their example.

12. Avoid hyphenation at the ends of lines. e.c

These are general rules. Needless to say, guidelines always take president. For extra information, check The Chicago Manual of Style. You can even find it online. Another good one is The Elements of Style by Strunk and White. There are many more style guides on the Internet.

Pat Decker Nipper is a native Idahoan and former teacher, now living and writing in San Jose, California. She is the author of Love on the Lewis and Clark Trail and a number of short stories and articles. For more information visit www.patdeckernipper.com

Join the beginner’s short story contest at http://www.CreativeWritingInstitute.com. Contest closes Aug. 31, 2012. Please FOLLOW the guidelines so your entry won’t be disqualified. Don’t forget to click “like” before you leave!